How to create email templates in PowerApps with Estimator Pro

How to create email templates in PowerApps with Estimator Pro

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I’m a Microsoft MVP  and Partner and CTO of Canviz Consulting. And, this article I’m going to give you a deep dive in PowerApps and I’m going to show you inside of the Estimator Pro PowerApps  sample template – how you can create dynamic email templates inside of a PowerApp. The Estimator Pro sample template allows you to create estimates for different projects you may have an email those estimates to potential or current customers. If you wish to learn more about this PowerApp, I suggest you look at the deep dive article that I have for this PowerApp as well as the installation instructions and the manual which gives you an end-to-end walk through the functionality. So in the interest of time, in this article since I’m just showing you how to create a dynamic email template in a PowerApp, I’ve already populated this PowerApp with information as well as attachment of a picture, a sketch, a couple different products, and a lot of information.

Now what I’d like to do is I’d actually like to send this estimate to someone and when I click send here it’s going to send-me email with all the information we saw in the previous page to this recipient I can add more than one here for like with this e-mail subject and this message. So I’m going to click send now that actually send an email off and now that’s done in the app I can create another estimate if I’d like. Now that the email has been sent, I can open up and here’s what it looks like. You can see the information we had in there before as well as the attachment the picture I took and also the sketch that was drawn in the app. So I’m going to dig into the app now and show you exactly how we were able to templatize this information and create dynamic email templates inside the PowerApp. So now I’ve returned to the page where I actually sent the email and as I mentioned many of the article that I’ve done for these different PowerApps we created, my favorite way to really learn how a PowerApp is working and dig into it is to play it inside of the editor like I’m doing here and preview mode and then take it out a preview mode which allows me to inspect controls and I can dig right into the control here by clicking on the send button really see what’s happening here under the hood. So if you’re ever work in with a PowerApp and you want to figure out how it works I suggest you follow the same process here.

There’s more than one way you can actually go about creating templated  pieces when you’d like to do exports to various places like email or OneNote in a PowerApp. The pattern that I’m showing here is one way to do it another pattern you can use you can actually find in the Meeting Capture app if you watch my deep dive article on how to export to OneNote, w’ere also creating html. and sending things in email. There we use a different pattern that for creating dynamic template based exports in PowerApps so you can check out that pattern as well but this pattern is a little bit more simple. This pattern essentially is going to generate some html. In a context variable we call email html right here. the way this works is at the top of the page we create a bunch of different collections that tells us which products their names the prices all kinds of information and metadata about the current quote that’s being built in the app and it gives us all that information right here so that we can use inside of our template. So our email html is essentially a string.

That you can see here is html. And, we’ve even baked in the css here so we can style it make sure it’s always available for us and you’ll notice here we’ve just got the html that’s going to create the email so whatever we want to put something dynamic into that email, for example, the subject. That’s where we grab that variable. And, then we can also even look at the first item in the order detail collection order date and convert that to text, for example, and, then here’s our format that we’re going to format that within so. The text function is being applied with this format to the order date coming out of this first item in this collection which then puts the order date inside e-mail as well.

Whatever as you can see PowerApp functions you’d like to use that your data you have full control over here. It’s a lot like doing things inside of a razor page ASP.NET or something like that. You can see several different places in here where our data is dynamic and then one interesting spot is right here in the products section. So as we look at the email that we have. It looks like this so here is product one in product two. You can see we have count of tow of them in the product section here and this is essentially using concatenation functions and different values out of the data that we have PowerApps to test where we’re adding that collection and render the html appropriately.

We can actually stack things one after another. When we’re all done creating our html, That ends right here at this line. So, here  is the actual code that actually sends the email. So if someone is selected,  the check box that says send the current person a copy,  then we would fall down into this category if they said don’t send the current person copy though we’re in this category. The only difference is we add the cc with the current users mail when we send carbon copy and copy the occur user on it. The important things to point out about actually sending the email here is if we look at the third argument. Here’s the body and the send email call to the Office 365 Outlook connector notice this is the email html context variable that we built up in the code just above this.  And, then the other key piece of the puzzle is html. We have that set the true because we are using html to format the email to make it look really nice here. If you’re not using html and you can still templatize things just in plain-text and then just set this to false.

As you can see it’s very easy to go about creating an email template and as I mentioned there’s other places and patterns where you can actually store this template and inject data into it. I encourage you to check out the Meeting Capture where it demonstrates how to store those templates in other places outside of the PowerApp so you don’t actually have to update the template inside of the PowerApp here if you’d like to change it. Hope this technique comes in handy for you and you enjoy the PowerApp.

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